Recent Changes

Wednesday, December 16

  1. page home edited Blog at http://www.blog.culturalecology.info On September 1st, 1933 an article describing the vi…
    Blog at http://www.blog.culturalecology.info
    On September 1st, 1933 an article describing the village of South Elmham All Saints-cum-St Nicholas appeared in the Suffolk Chronicle and Mercury. The author was 'Yeoman', the tag of a regular contributor to the newspaper on the history of local communities. In fact, this was his article No 323 of what were described as 'Pocket Histories of Suffolk Parishes'. In the article, Yeoman set out the reasons why the particular community he was writing about was representative of a unique group of nine parishes in the English county of Suffolk on its north eastern border with Norfolk. Together with the four eastern parishes of Ilketshall, each one dedicated to a different saint, local people refer to them as 'The Saints'.
    Yeoman's articles on the nine parishes can be accessed from the left hand menu.
    Fig 1 The Nine Parishes in relation to the local drainage pattern and surrounding villages and the River Waveney boundary between Suffolk and Norfolk
    ...
    intensive cereal production. Theproduction.The dust cover
    ...
    a contribution to W.G.toW.G. Hoskins' series
    ...
    and Constable'.
    These

    These
    famous 'calming
    ...
    ports and heathlands. However,heathlands.However, the next
    ...
    story of settlement. Howsettlement.How and when
    ...
    the first time. Thetime.The distinctive, rather
    ...
    East Anglia'.
    The first settlers of East Anglia were not motivated by areas of outstanding natural beauty but by fertile spaces with natural resources for survival and raising families. This first human impact is responsible for 'the distinctive rather hidden personality' of a small space on Suffolk's northern border with Norfolk consisting of nine closely knit communities, known locally as The Nine Parishes or 'The Saints'. The clues to discover its sense of place are a single man-made feature, that is unique in the whole of Britain, and a remarkable pattern of settlement which is now only evident in old maps. Beginning with these two features it is possible to reveal the distinctive personality of The Saints which is coupled with the beginnings of East Anglian Christianity. The area of the Nine Parishes then becomes a space with a sense of place and picturing it adds important notional values to commonplace streams, ditches and hedgerows of a tiny strtetch of countryside that for a few centuries played a cultural role in the making of Englishness.
    View The Saints at Google Maps
    (view changes)
    11:44 pm

Saturday, April 5

  1. page St Peters Directory edited ... DUTT South Elmham St Peter church (4 m. S. of Bungay) is chiefly Perp., but the S. doorway is…
    ...
    DUTT
    South Elmham St Peter church (4 m. S. of Bungay) is chiefly Perp., but the S. doorway is Norm., and there is a Dec. E. window. Note (1) the chancel arch; and (2) the nave roof. St Peter's Hall, now a farmhouse, was formerly a seat of the Tasburgh family. It is a moated house, part of which is believed to date from the latter part of the fifteenth century.

    (view changes)

Sunday, December 11

  1. page Holy Suffolk edited ... From this register, however, Foxe has given some precious details, as of John Skilley of ' Fli…
    ...
    From this register, however, Foxe has given some precious details, as of John Skilley of ' Flixon,' miller, who was 'injoyned for penance seven yeares imprisonment in the monastery of Langley,' and for the enormity of eating flesh on Fridays he was put on a bread and water diet on Fridays during his imprisonment, and when his time was up he had to put in four appearances at the cathedral, with the other penitentiaries, two on the ensuing Ash Wednesdays, and two on the ensuing Maundy Thursdays. Like St. Paul, these bold thinkers were often `in peril among false brethren'".
    .
    Christianity
    (view changes)

Tuesday, November 15

  1. page Bungay Town Reeve edited ... The glorious culmination of the year of office comes with the Town Dinner. This major event, k…
    ...
    The glorious culmination of the year of office comes with the Town Dinner. This major event, known to have been held from 1725, and possibly even earlier, at the annual `reckoning', or audit of the town accounts, was originally a period of merriment and cheer lasting from 3 p.m. onwards! Having been allowed to lapse in 1873, it was sixty years later revived, and is now held on the Friday evening preceeding the Town Meeting, its various homes having been the King's Head Hotel, the Secondary Modern School, and latterly the Community Centre and Bungay High School. The Town Reeve presides over an elegant company, and will have been responsible for the choice of principal guest speakers, who traditionally have been folk connected with his or her own calling or profession. Loyal and other toasts are drunk, there is dancing, and eagerly awaited annually is the singing, with additional topical verses, of the song `Old Bungay', originally sung at Bungay theatre in 1816. One could, in fact, do far worse, before proceeding to list and account for those who have held the office of Town Reeve of Bungay, than to conclude this general summary of the historic office itself by reiterating that song's famous chorus, being words in praise of the town of which, by common consent datimg back into the mists of time, the Town Reeve is the civic and social head:
    'Of all the fam'd towns this famed Island can boast,
    ...
    whole host!
    Then

    Then
    of all
    ...
    of renown:
    Oh!

    Oh!
    What a
    ...
    Old Bungay!
    Old Bungay's a wonderful Town!'
    From 'The Town Reeves of Bungay' by John Harris (Roseland Publishing).
    (view changes)

Wednesday, June 9

  1. page Flixton Hall edited ... {R0007.JPG} The last Adair to own Flixton Hall was Major General, Sir Allan Shafto Adair, 6t…
    ...
    {R0007.JPG}
    The last Adair to own Flixton Hall was Major General, Sir Allan Shafto Adair, 6th Bt. Death duties forced the sale of the house, its contents and 250 acres surrounding it. After disposing of the contents in 1880 lots, such as a library of about 7,000 books, it was purchased by Mr. R.G. Lawrence in 1950. He dismantled it almost to ground level, salvaging valuable materials such as the fine interior woodwork, windows, stonework and brickwork.
    See An Elegy for Flixton Hall on Utube
    The Ownership of Flixton Hall in the Adair Family 1753-1950
    1- William Adair, 1753-1783, to his nephew.
    (view changes)
    8:44 am

Sunday, May 16

  1. page Flixton Hypertrail edited ... Flixton is very rich in historical events, which unlike the other nine parishes have greatly c…
    ...
    Flixton is very rich in historical events, which unlike the other nine parishes have greatly changed the appearance and human activities wich now characterise the village. The Flixton Hypertrail is an experiment in learning which starts with a set of nodes representing the major historical and visual starters.
    {Tasburgh_Adair_families.pdf}
    Satellite view of site of Flixton Park
    (view changes)
    8:44 am

Thursday, May 13

  1. page Flixton Hypertrail edited ... The essence of the hypertrail is its non-linearity. In this context it may be defined as hyper…
    ...
    The essence of the hypertrail is its non-linearity. In this context it may be defined as hypermedia. Hypermedia systems are non-linear and non-sequential. In practice this means that the user does not have to proceed through an application in a set manner - screen A,, then screen B, then screen C, etc - as would be appropriate in a tutorial or a demonstration, but instead has the freedom to roam around within the application, to move from node to node via semantic links. For example, in a hypermedia tutorial I recently developed in collaboration with a lecturer in Hispanic Studies on the subject of the Spanish Civil War, the student may click on a hypertext reference to Largo Caballero, a prominent socialist politician of the time, which lead to a biographical page containing his photograph and a recording of a speech by him as well as a textual description, which in turn contains hypertext references to his party which can be followed to a description of the party, which contains references to prominent figures which can also be followed, and so on. This can lead the student to investigate other related, but perhaps tangential topics in a way which would be very difficult in a linear system, such as a tutorial or a book.
    A hyperpath is an example of a multimedia education system. Whilst the terms multimedia and hypermedia are often used interchangeably there is a conceptual difference between the two. Multimedia refers to the integration of two or more different information media within a computer system. These media can include text, images, audio, video, and animation, and in the medium-term future we can expect tactile media from the VR world, such as datagloves and spaceballs. Hypermedia is the extension of the hypertext paradigm to multimedia. Hypertext systems consist of nodes, holding textual information, and links, which represent semantic associations between the nodes and could be thought of as cross-references. The links are created by the author of the system, and in most cases the user is free to follow links in a non-linear fashion. In hypermedia the nodes of information may be any medium, not just text. Whilst all hypermedia systems are of necessity multimedia, not all multimedia systems are hypermedia.
    ...
    have greatly changechanged the appearance
    {Tasburgh_Adair_families.pdf}
    (view changes)
    11:58 am

Tuesday, April 20

  1. page Airfield edited ... Flixton armourer with a bomb load {R0028.jpg} From November 1943, Flixton Airfield (Statio…
    ...
    Flixton armourer with a bomb load
    {R0028.jpg}
    From November 1943, Flixton Airfield (Station 125) was the base of the 446th Bomb Group, comprising the 704th, 705th, 706th and 707th Bombardment Squadrons, amounting to almost 3000 men, known collectively as the 'Bungay Buckaroos'. The station flew and maintained the 446th's B24 Liberators, which day after day delivered their bomb loads into the German heartland. The 446th was a part of the 20th Combat Wing, of the Second Air Division of the USAAF. After hostilities ceased, the all units returned to the US to be disbanded and the RAF occupied the site until 1956.
    (view changes)
    8:40 am
  2. page Flixton edited ... Flixton Convent (Priory) Airfield Boyses Hall Flixton Hypertrail
    ...
    Flixton Convent (Priory)
    Airfield
    Boyses Hall
    Flixton Hypertrail
    (view changes)
    8:27 am
  3. page Boyes Hall edited {boyes_hall.jpg} By an inquisitio post mortem, taken the 30th of May, in the 5th of Charles I.,…
    {boyes_hall.jpg}
    By an inquisitio post mortem, taken the 30th of May, in the 5th of Charles I., John Tasburgh, Knight, was found to die, on the 24th of April, in the same year, seized of the manor of South Elmham, Boyses, Sandcroft, Newhall, Flixton, &c.
    According to Coppinger, "the manors, therefore, of Sandcroft, Newhall, Boyses, Flixton, &c., appear to have grown out of the greater or paramount manor of South Elmham at a very early period; for though Almaham, or Elmham, is returned in Domesday as the lordship of the Bishop of Thetford, it is even then said "alii ibi tenent." Blomefield, the historian of Norfolk, asserts that the ancestors of Archbishop Sandcroft, of Fressingfield, derived their name from this village, though Dr. D'Oyley, in his history of that primate, does not notice this circumstance. But the fact that Robert de Sandcroft was patron of this church in the year 1319, goes far to confirm Blomefield's position. The parish of Sandcroft, or St. George, passed from the Tasburghs to the Adairs, and forms part of the Flixton estate"
    Boyses, or Boys, Hall is shown above surrounded by a very large moat on the first OS map of the Flixton Estate about a mile to the East of Flixton Hall. The moat is still present and is currently (2010) used as a sink for polluted water draining from a large industrial estate in field 233.
    From: 'South Elmham, St George or St Cross', The History and Antiquities of the County of Suffolk: volume 1 (1846), pp. 207-212. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=115638 Date accessed: 20 April 2010.

    (view changes)
    8:26 am

More